Sri Lanka’s new president gets down to mending ties

Sri Lanka’s new president gets down to mending ties

New Sri Lankan President Maithripala Sirisena began assembling a cabinet today on his first day in office as he looks to deliver on pledges to repair the war-torn nation’s diplomatic standing and implement democratic reforms.

Sirisena, who was sworn in yesterday evening after a shock election victory over veteran strongman Mahinda Rajapakse, was trying to form a “national unity” cabinet that would include members from a cross section of political parties in parliament, an aide said.

“The main task is to choose a cabinet and the work is already underway,” Nishantha Warnasinghe told AFP. Sirisena had offered a 100-day programme to carry out urgent political and economic reforms, including moves to cut back on the powers of the president that Rajapakse gave himself during a decade in office.

Shortly after being sworn in, Sirisena appointed as new prime minister the parliamentary opposition leader Ranil Wickremesinghe, who is expected to wield considerable power.

Sirisena is expected to make another address to the nation from the historic hill resort of Kandy on Sunday, officials said.

Prime Minister Wickremesinghe, meanwhile, was travelling to the southern region of Ratnapura Saturday to attend the funeral of a supporter who was shot on the final day of campaigning and succumbed to his injuries on the eve of Thursday’s vote, his office said.

Wickremesinghe is seen as having significantly better relations with the West than Rajapakse and regional powerhouse India is expected to play a key role in choosing the new cabinet.

In a previous stint as prime minister between 2002 and 2004, he managed to secure international support for a peace process designed to end the island’s long-running Tamil separatist conflict.

The efforts ultimately failed as Norwegian-brokered negotiations fell apart when Tamil Tiger rebels broke off talks and returned to fighting in 2006, soon after the hardline nationalist Rajapakse came to power.

Rajapakse came to be shunned by many Western nations, who accused him of turning a blind eye to large-scale human rights abuses.

Several leaders, including the Indian and Canadian prime ministers, boycotted a Commonwealth summit hosted by the strongman leader in November 2013 over his refusal to allow an international investigation into claims of massacres at the end of the 37-year war in May 2009. India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi and British leader David Cameron were among the first to congratulate Sirisena.

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